Friday, 12 December 2014

The grave of a murderer.

 St Andrew, Presteigne, Powys, Wales
(Click on an image for a larger version)


This church incorporates some elements of its late-Saxon predecessor on this site. The present building can be traced back to early Norman times, and was extended to its current length in the late 12th century, when a self-standing tower was erected. Another enlargement followed in the 14th century, adding the existing nave and a south aisle which connected the tower to the rest of the building.
 
 
Mary Morgan was a young servant convicted and hanged for killing her newborn child. On 13 April Morgan was hanged, and was buried in what was then unconsecrated ground near the church later that same afternoon. Her public execution attracted large crowds, who watched as she was taken by cart from the gaol to the execution at Gallows Lane. 
 
 
 
Visited - June 2014

All my new discoveries are published first on the social history group on Facebook so if you want to keep up to date with what is happening you will need to subscribe to the group by clicking on the link below.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/609806292391471/ 

Wednesday, 10 December 2014

I have included both sides of this unique design.

 Kingsthorpe Cemetery, Northampton
(Click on an image for a larger version)

 
One strange feature of this cemetery is the high percentage of
gravestones lacking some of the key details.
 
 
 I have included both sides of the gravestone.
 
 
 Visited - December 2008

All my new discoveries are published first on the social history group on Facebook so if you want to keep up to date with what is happening you will need to subscribe to the group by clicking on the link below.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/609806292391471/ 

John Wall was beatified by Pius XI and canonised by Paul VI.

 St Mary, Harvington, Worcestershire
(Click on an image for a larger version)


 
Curiously authorities differ as to exactly when John Wall and other English martyrs were beatified by Pius XI and canonised by Paul VI.
 


  
Visited - March 2011

All my new discoveries are published first on the social history group on Facebook so if you want to keep up to date with what is happening you will need to subscribe to the group by clicking on the link below.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/609806292391471/ 

Tuesday, 9 December 2014

It is those Roman numerals again!

 St Aelhaiarn, Guilsfield, Powys, Wales
(Click on an image for a larger version)


The site of St. Aelhaiarn’s Church appears to be of early medieval origin, and is believed to have been founded by St. Aelhaiarn in the sixth century. Much of the visible church standing on the site today dates to the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, but the core is of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Thorough restoration work was carried out by G.E. Street in 1877-9, in which many of the original features of the building were swept away, but the church does nonetheless retain some early points of interest, most particularly the octagonal twelfth century font with four large masks.
 
 
 The arrangement of the text has been far made more complex than it need have been. It is those Roman numerals again!   
 
Visited - September 2014

All my new discoveries are published first on the social history group on Facebook so if you want to keep up to date with what is happening you will need to subscribe to the group by clicking on the link below.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/609806292391471/ 

The grave of a young girl whose last words were, "To Heaven Mamma."

 St Michael and All Angels, Cofton Hackett, Worcestershire
(Click on an image for a larger version)


The church was in a peaceful location except when trains were ascending or descending the infamous "Lickey Incline" which ran alongside the graveyard.
 
 
The grave of a young girl whose last words were, "To Heaven Mamma."
 
Visited - March 2014

All my new discoveries are published first on the social history group on Facebook so if you want to keep up to date with what is happening you will need to subscribe to the group by clicking on the link below.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/609806292391471/ 

Sunday, 7 December 2014

This wooden memorial to three of the sisters of Jane Verson was erected in 1642.

 St Margaret, Moreton Say, Shropshire
(Click on an image for a larger version)


We met the vicar just as we were leaving and he was kind
enough to unlock the church for us.
 
 
This wooden memorial to three of the sisters of Jane Verson was erected in 1642. 
 
Visited - April 2014

All my new discoveries are published first on the social history group on Facebook so if you want to keep up to date with what is happening you will need to subscribe to the group by clicking on the link below.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/609806292391471/ 

29 members of the mostly American crew were lost in the sinking of the Armenian

 St Enodoc, near Trebetherick, Cornwall
(Click on an image for a larger version)


St Enodoc Church, Trebetherick is a chapel of ease in the parish of St Minver. Wind-driven sand has formed banks that are almost level with the roof on two sides. From the 16th century to the middle of the 19th century, the church was virtually buried by the dunes and was known locally as "Sinking Neddy".
 
 
On 28 June 1915 the Armenian was engaged by the German submarine U-24 off Trevose Head, Cornwall. After a failed attempt at escape the crew were allowed to abandon ship and the vessel was sunk by two torpedoes fired into her stern. Twenty-nine members of the mostly American crew were lost in the sinking, along with the vessel's cargo of 1,400 mules.
 
Visited - June 2014

All my new discoveries are published first on the social history group on Facebook so if you want to keep up to date with what is happening you will need to subscribe to the group by clicking on the link below.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/609806292391471/